Who Else Wants to Feel More Inspired?

fire-firework-light-5076 smStudies confirm that some people feel inspired more often than the rest of us. Do you regularly feel inspired? Typically, when you are feeling inspired, you feel more grateful.

While those moments of revelation may seem elusive, the impact is powerful. The more you feel inspired, the more inspired you will feel! It is an AWESOME cycle!

In addition to the initial exhilaration, inspiration can make you more productive and successful. You perform better and enjoy your work more.

The good news is that these same studies suggest habits that you can cultivate that will bring more enthusiasm into your activities. Try these tips to awaken your inner muse.

How to Feel Inspired More Often

1. Take action. There are better strategies than sitting around waiting for inspiration to strike. You’re more likely to gain insights while you’re working on a project rather than putting it off until you feel more motivated. Start writing your first novel or contact acquaintances who might want to invest in your start-up business.

2. Focus on intrinsic motivation. Inspiration is more abundant when you’re engaged in activities that you value for their own sake. Put aside thoughts about competing with others or earning money. Contemplate how much you enjoy singing in the church choir or riding your bike.

3. Head outdoors. Sunlight and natural beauty make your mind more receptive. Pack a picnic lunch and take a hike.

4. Appreciate art. Visit an art museum to learn from old masters or browse through an auction catalog. Examining the work of others can prepare you for your own breakthroughs.

5. Learn about science. Science is another field that offers opportunities to unleash your own genius. Scan the latest headlines about progress in medical research or renewable energy.

6. Express gratitude. However we describe inspiration, it usually has something to do with transcending our ordinary experiences. Pick something you tend to take for granted and look at it more closely. Feel thankful for rain and squirrels.

7. Meditate and pray. Many adults associate inspiration with their spiritual practices. Schedule time each day to read something that touches your heart. Talk with others about how you connect with the divine. Develop a daily meditation practice or attend worship services.

How to Sustain Your Inspiration

1. Set goals. Inspiration tends to reinforce itself. Translate your visions into challenging goals. Once you reach them, use that motivation to create new goals that aim even higher.

2. Go public. You’re more likely to implement your inspiration when you share it with others. If you tell your boss that you have a plan for cutting travel costs, she’s probably going to expect a status report soon. When your kids know that you figured out a way to afford a family ski vacation, they’ll remind you to pack your suitcases.

3. Think positive. Inspiration and optimism go hand in hand. When you’re cheerful and upbeat, you’re more receptive to fresh ideas and making changes.

4. Study role models. Of course, bringing your eureka moments to life still requires courage and effort. Imagine how your mentor or a historical figure you admire would rise to the challenge.

5. Develop patience. Inspiration can be a sudden flash of lightening, but it may also be a long process. You’ll need to persevere if you want to realize the full benefits of a promising opportunity.

6. Stay fit. Considering the close connection between body and mind, it’s natural that staying healthy invites more inspirational moments into your days and nights. Exercise regularly, eat a balanced diet full of natural foods, and enjoy plenty of good quality sleep and rest.

Prepare yourself to experience more brainstorms and apply them to your daily life. Drawing on inspiration nourishes creativity and hope. You’ll achieve more and find the journey more pleasant.

Somethings Coming

Natalie Wood as Maria in West Side Story

Today’s Gratitude Burst was a Native American Saying that reminded me of how Gratitude and good things are always coming to us. We might not know what it is, or what to expect, but they are coming.

The Burst reminded me of the lyrics to the song from West Side Story, Somethings Coming. Tony, the male lead, gets a feeling that something is going to happen that day – he is not sure what – but he knows, something is coming. It is that night that he meets, and falls in love, with Maria.

These lyrics certainly apply to gratitude as well.

 

 

Somethings Coming

Could be
Who knows?
There’s something due any day
I will know right away
Soon as it shows

It may come cannonballin’ down through the sky
Gleam in its eye
Bright as a rose!
Who knows?

It’s only just out of reach
Down the block, on a beach
Under a tree

I got a feeling there’s a miracle due
Gonna come true
Coming to me
Could it be?
Yes it could
Something’s coming
Something good
If I can wait

Something’s coming I don’t know what it is
But it is
Gonna be great!

With a click
With a shock
Phone’ll jingle
Door’ll knock
Open the latch!

Something’s coming, don’t know when
But it’s soon
Catch the moon
One handed catch
Around the corner
Or whistling down the river
Come on – deliver
To me

Will it be? Yes it will
Maybe just by holding still
It’ll be there!

Come on, something, come on in
Don’t be shy
Meet a guy
Pull up a chair
The air is hummin’
And something great is coming
Who knows
It’s only just
Out of reach
Down the block, on a beach
Maybe tonight
Maybe tonight…

Be Well.
Paul.
The Gratitude Guru

A sweet lesson on patience.

This was posted on Facebook although I have read it before. I thought it was worth sharing here.

A NYC Taxi driver wrote:

I arrived at the address and honked the horn. After waiting a few minutes I honked again. Since this was going to be my last ride of my shift I thought about just driving away, but instead I put the car in park and walked up to the door and knocked.. ‘Just a minute’, answered a frail, elderly voice. I could hear something being dragged across the floor.

After a long pause, the door opened. A small woman in her 90’s stood before me. She was wearing a print dress and a pillbox hat with a veil pinned on it, like somebody out of a 1940’s movie.

By her side was a small nylon suitcase. The apartment looked as if no one had lived in it for years. All the furniture was covered with sheets.

There were no clocks on the walls, no knickknacks or utensils on the counters. In the corner was a cardboard box filled with photos and glassware.

‘Would you carry my bag out to the car?’ she said. I took the suitcase to the cab, then returned to assist the woman.

She took my arm and we walked slowly toward the curb.

She kept thanking me for my kindness. ‘It’s nothing’, I told her.. ‘I just try to treat my passengers the way I would want my mother to be treated.’

‘Oh, you’re such a good boy, she said. When we got in the cab, she gave me an address and then asked, ‘Could you drive through downtown?’

‘It’s not the shortest way,’ I answered quickly.

‘Oh, I don’t mind,’ she said. ‘I’m in no hurry. I’m on my way to a hospice.

I looked in the rear-view mirror. Her eyes were glistening. ‘I don’t have any family left,’ she continued in a soft voice. ‘The doctor says I don’t have very long.’ I quietly reached over and shut off the meter.

‘What route would you like me to take?’ I asked.

For the next two hours, we drove through the city. She showed me the building where she had once worked as an elevator operator.

We drove through the neighborhood where she and her husband had lived when they were newlyweds She had me pull up in front of a furniture warehouse that had once been a ballroom where she had gone dancing as a girl.

Sometimes she’d ask me to slow in front of a particular building or corner and would sit staring into the darkness, saying nothing.

As the first hint of sun was creasing the horizon, she suddenly said, ‘I’m tired. Let’s go now’.

We drove in silence to the address she had given me. It was a low building, like a small convalescent home, with a driveway that passed under a portico.

Two orderlies came out to the cab as soon as we pulled up. They were solicitous and intent, watching her every move. They must have been expecting her.

I opened the trunk and took the small suitcase to the door. The woman was already seated in a wheelchair.

‘How much do I owe you?’ she asked, reaching into her purse.

‘Nothing,’ I said.

‘You have to make a living,’ she answered.

‘There are other passengers,’ I responded.

Almost without thinking, I bent and gave her a hug. She held onto me tightly.

‘You gave an old woman a little moment of joy,’ she said. ‘Thank you.’

I squeezed her hand, and then walked into the dim morning light. Behind me, a door shut. It was the sound of the closing of a life.

I didn’t pick up any more passengers that shift. I drove aimlessly lost in thought. For the rest of that day, I could hardly talk. What if that woman had gotten an angry driver, or one who was impatient to end his shift? What if I had refused to take the run, or had honked once, then driven away?

On a quick review, I don’t think that I have done anything more important in my life.

We’re conditioned to think that our lives revolve around great moments.

But great moments often catch us unaware-beautifully wrapped in what others may consider a small one.

Mason Wartman’s Pizza Shop

Wow! What a great idea! The next time I am in Philly, I am stopping in and posting a lot of Post-It notes!

A New Momment

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